Paul McGann is no angel in Moira Buffini’s wartime drama, Gabriel

Production images Robin Savage

It’s 30 years since Paul McGann made a name for himself in the classic cult film Withnail & I.

Now he’s embarking on his first UK theatre tour playing German Major Von Pfunz in Gabriel which is playing at Richmond Theatre this week. Kate Gould caught up with him for a chat.

Paul McGann needs no introduction. He’s the man whose portrayal of the eponymous I in the cult classic Withnail & I propelled him to stardom. That was 30 years ago and in the years since his career has gone from strength to strength and he’s become a householdname in the process.

His CV is as impressive as it gets showing his versatility as an actor with performances on both stage and screen including in Hornblower and Luther and, of course, playing the eighth incarnation of the Doctor in Doctor Who.

But he’s never done a UK theatre tour – until now. For next month the 57-year-old actor is to pack his bags for an eight-week stint in Moira Buffini’s acclaimed play, Gabriel, which, this year, celebrates its 20th anniversary.

Set in 1943 German occupied Guernsey, it tells the story of widow and mother Jeanne who does whatever it takes to keep her adolescent daughter Estelle and daughter-in-law Lily safe on an island filled with danger and fear.

However she meets her toughest test in the form of the terrifying Commander Von Pfunz (McGann) whose romantic advances are dangerous to say the least but which may be the only way to keep her family alive.

Tension mounts when a mysterious young man is washed ashore with no memory of who he is.

It transpires he’s fluent in German and English, so the question is, is he an RAF pilot, an SS interrogator, a local boy with amnesia or a saviour sent from heaven?

McGann mety the press at a private members’ club in central London, spending the day chatting to journalists about the production before he got stuck into the rigours of rehearsals. The tour began in Richmond Tuesday and has its official opening night for critics tomorrow.

If he’s growing weary of the barrage of questions he doesn’t show it. In fact he is as relaxed as they come with an easy going manner, affable charm and a warm sense of humour.

So keen is he about the production, and being part of it, that he wastes no time in telling me all about it and about the research he did into the occupation of the island.

“It’s a fascinating piece,” he says. “It’s dark and intense, although it’s not all doom and gloom of course, but it’s a real thriller, exciting and incredibly gripping.

“It’s set in Guernsey in the middle of the Second World War, and it’s a great place to set a story. It was a strange time for the islanders as in many respects, life continued as normal.

“On the face of it, it was a peaceful occupation. There was no armed resistance nor any uprisings.

“However food was scarce, there was a thriving black market, and plenty of wheeling and dealing going on.

“Indeed some people made a fortune. And while some worked the land, most of the men of fighting age were away so it was mainly women left on the island.

“So to have the central character in this play a woman is entirely fitting. Jeanne is widowed and has a daughter with whom she lives and a son who is in the forces.

“Her house is requisitioned by the German so she has to be careful. There are hints that she had a relationship with a German officer who has now been sent away and by all accounts they got on well – and again if you read the history books, this was what happened in many cases.”

Into her life comes Von Pfunz, an army officer who has served in Poland but has now been sent to Guernsey and finds himself captivated by Jeanne.

“He’s not a nice man, in fact he’s horrible, and he comes on to Jeanne much to her disgust,” he grimaces.

“She is repulsed by him and is quite fearful of him, but there is a courage about her that he finds thrilling and intoxicating. It throws her completely.

“Her dilemma is how to get on with the Germans, keep her family safe and survive without submitting to something she doesn’t want, where a mistake could be fatal.

“The tension grows when a young man appears, washed up on a nearby beach. The girls save him and bring him to Jeanne’s house where he’s hidden.

“He claims not to know who he is, and when Von Pfunz later discovers him there the boy is able to speak with him in perfect German.”

It was, Paul says, a play he was instantly drawn to not least by the writing which he describes as “superb”.

“The writing is key and is what really attracted me to playing this role,” he says.

“Von Pfunz is like nobody I’ve played before but it’s the way Moira beautifully weaves these situations and tensions together that is so good.

“It’s brilliantly told and when you get a really good story as an actor you can’t wait to tell it.”

Keen not to give away any spoilers, Paul simply says the audience will be on the edge of their seats to find out what happens.

“Jeanne is constantly in danger, the tension builds to a crescendo and she ends up in a really tight corner,” he says eyes twinkling.

It’s clear throughout our chat that Paul still gets a buzz out of being on stage and he says he’s excited to be making his debut theatre tour in such a “fantastic play”.

“I’ve found over the years that the old actor clichè is true that live is best,” he smiles.

“Doing TV and film is great, and I’ve been jammy enough over the years to do a lot of it, but when you go out on stage and feel the atmosphere and get that instant feedback from the audience, you just can’t beat it.

“It is also a way of working that teaches you the most.”

So why has it taken so long to get out on the road? It seems it’s mainly down to logistics and finding the right vehicle for his talents. This particular role and the fact his two sons are grown up has allowed him the flexibility to take on the challenge of a tour.

“Many touring shows are musicals and there are few straight dramatic plays. I’ve been offered tours in the past, some of which were tempting, but they tended to last for months so were difficult to commit to.

“This one stood out though as it’s so thrilling so I was really up for it. Also I’ll get a chance to discover and visit all these theatres that I’ve never performed in before as well as the different characters of the audiences, which I’m really looking forward to. It’s a new experience for me.

“It’ll be a bit like running away to the circus!”

Paul is endearingly modest about his career and the word “jammy” to describe it crops up often.

It is a surprise when he insists he never wanted to be an actor, instead harboured dreams of being a track and field sportsman.

He was eventually persuaded to give acting a shot when he was 17 by one of his teachers. Somewhat alarmingly he also tells me he very nearly didn’t go to the RADA audition that had been organised for him as he was so unsure about whether it was the right thing to do.

Fortunately for his legions of fans he didn’t walk past the door but went through it and got in on his first audition. He spent the next few years there “very happy” alongside such notables as Kenneth Branagh and Mark Rylance and says he has no regrets.

“I was a ’70s kid growing up in Liverpool, left school at 17, not qualified in anything and never thought about being an actor,” he remembers smiling.

“However, my teacher saw something in me and helped me prepare my audition to RADA. It was pretty embarrassing and I felt it went terribly. But I got in, and I loved it.

“I remember there were plenty of working class kids at RADA then. I think most of us had just fancied being movie stars.

“Of course that was all pie in the sky as there was no guarantee you’d even get into Equity. I was pretty jammy to get Withnail & I after just five years out. I loved working on it.

“We were pretty innocent and, in truth, didn’t really know what we were doing. We certainly had no idea how cool it would become.”

“Theatre has always been my favourite though – it’s what many actors will tell you – and the older I get the more I prefer it although I still get very nervous.

“I’ve been lucky enough to play some incredible roles over the years and I’m proud to add Commander Von Pfunz to that list.”

Tour dates

Until Saturday, Richmond Theatre
April 4-8,Liverpool Playhouse
April 11-15, Devonshire Park Theatre
April 18-22, Theatr Clwyd
April 24-29, Theatre Royal Windsor
May 8-13, Greenwich Theatre
May 15-20, Yvonne Arnaud Theatre

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